July 31, 2021

Bad Police Work in Desert Hot Springs

Here's an article in the Press-Enterprise about the false charges brought against Roger Wayne Parker after DHS Police detectives did a poor job of trying to elicit a false confession from him.

He continued in the memo: "Many of these questions cannot be answered by 'further investigation.' There were many mistakes made during the investigation of this case. These mistakes cannot be undone, nor can many of them be remedied by further investigation. Forensic evidence hurts our case against the defendant and illustrates the mistakes made by law enforcement during the case investigation. It creates very reasonable doubt as to the defendant's guilt. Therefore, it is recommended that this case be dismissed."

Ross' lawsuit sums it up this way: "The facts demonstrated extremely shoddy police work that coerced a confession from an innocent man with significant intellectual disabilities who plainly knew nothing about the crime. The evidence, in fact, pointed to another individual as the guilty party."

Desert Hot Springs Police Chief Jim Henson declined comment on the quality of the police work and why the case remains unsolved. Henson, coincidentally, was one of the lead investigators on the Stevenson murder case.

permalink | July 31, 2021 at 09:16 AM | Comments (0)

July 20, 2021

Indictments For Gender Reveal Party

Refugio Manuel Jimenez Jr. and Angela Renee Jimenez have been indicted for "one count of involuntary manslaughter, three felony counts of recklessly causing a fire with great bodily injury, four felony counts of recklessly causing a fire to inhabited structures and 22 misdemeanor counts" because their gender reveal party on September 5, 2020, involved a pyrotechnic device that ignited the El Dorado Fire which killed one firefighter, injured thirteen others, burned 22,680 acres, destroying five homes and damaging four others.

permalink | July 20, 2021 at 06:01 PM | Comments (0)

June 18, 2021

California(?) Traffic Break

Here's a video showing a traffic break being put into effect by the California Highway Patrol on a freeway in the Bay Area. They do this when debris needs to be cleared from a highway, or when they need to do a quick, temporary patch for a pothole. They should do this in all 50 states plus DC, but I never saw it before I came to California and when I've mentioned it to some non-Californians they say they never saw it in their home states.

permalink | June 18, 2021 at 08:42 PM | Comments (0)

Safest US States For LGBTQ+

California and Vermont tied for the safest. Massachusetts is #7. District of Columbia, New Jersey and Nevada are tied for 16th. Arizona is 28th. Texas is 32nd. Missouri is #37. Kansas lands at 49. And bringing up the bottom are South Dakota at #50 and North Dakota at #51.

One thing they seem to take into account is the number of "LGBTQ+ family populations" in the state. They don't define "LGBTQ+ family." Does that include LGBTQ+ households? I live alone. Do I count as an "LQBTQ+ family?" Does it mean only households with more than one resident? Do all the residents of the household have to be LGBTQ+? If so, how are children counted, if at all?

permalink | June 18, 2021 at 12:05 PM | Comments (0)

June 8, 2021

That Pharmacist

That Wisconsin pharmacist who destroyed 500 doses of Moderna COVID vaccine has been sentenced to three years in federal prison. After that he will serve three years of supervised release.

permalink | June 8, 2021 at 01:02 PM | Comments (0)

May 24, 2021

Lake Fire in Jurupa Valley

permalink | May 24, 2021 at 06:33 PM | Comments (0)

May 21, 2021

California Republican Party Settles A Lawsuit

From yesterday's Orange County Register. An uninsured campaign for a Republican candidate hired a person with no drivers license (and, presumably, no personal auto insurance) to drive around the district. The candidate had formed a joint venture with the California GOP which opened them up for liability...and they were the deeper pocket.

Man injured in car crash to receive $11M from state GOP

By Sean Emery

The California Republican Party has agreed to an $11 million dollar settlement with a Riverside County motorcyclist who suffered life-altering injuries in an Orange County freeway crash that a lawsuit says was caused by an unlicensed campaign worker employed by a then-state assemblyman.

The agreement tentatively ends a civil lawsuit filed in Orange County Superior Court on behalf of Richard Ruehle, who was left a quadriplegic by the traffic collision on Aug. 5, 2016, on the eastbound 91 Freeway near the Orange County-Riverside County border.

"In 2016, an employee of a California Assembly campaign was involved in a car accident that permanently impacted the life of the plaintiff," said Ashlee Titus, the California Republican Party's general counsel, in a statement.

"The individual involved in the car accident was not an employee of the California Republican Party," she said of the car's driver. "The settlement was entirely paid by our insurance company, Travelers Insurance Company, and not by the party. We continue to wish the best for everyone involved."

Ruehle was returning to his Riverside County home around 3:30 p.m. on a Yamaha when struck by a Chevrolet Malibu near Gypsum Canyon Road, according to court filings.

"Richard was really the family's breadwinner, so this accident was such a tragedy in so many ways, both to him physically and to the family's livelihood," said Megan Demshki, an attorney with Orange County-based Aitken Aitken Cohn. "It is our hope that this (settlement) will help him provide for his family and seek the medical care he needs."

The Malibu's driver was working as a paid employee for the 2016 Eric Linder for State Assembly campaign, Demshki said. The Linder campaign was uninsured, the plaintiff's attorney added.

Linder, a Corona Republican who lost the 2016 race after serving in Sacramento from 2012 to 2016, could not be reached for comment Thursday regarding the settlement.

Demshki said her team discovered that Linder's campaign had formed a joint venture with the California Republican Party. Along with seeking to get Linder elected, the attorney said, workers for the campaign were gathering data from potential voters that could be used in a statewide database for future campaigns across the state.

The plaintiff attorney's said this meant that the California Republican Party was also accountable for Ruehle's injuries and the actions of the Malibu's driver, who they described as having no experience canvassing a precinct or campaigning. Demshki said he had never had a driver's license, which apparently hadn't been checked before getting hired.

"Why should those large political employers be less accountable than Amazon drivers, Domino's Pizza drivers and others using our highways at potential risk to others?" Wylie Aitkin, the founder of the firm that represented Ruehle, said in a statement.

Ruehle is the father of six children and was an active hiker, martial artist and outdoorsman prior to the crash, his lawyers said. Along with physical therapy, Ruehle has taken up adaptive CrossFit to regain his strength.

Ruehle has also become an active volunteer with the Triumph Foundation, serving as a speaker and counselor for others who have been newly diagnosed with spinal-cord injuries, his attorney said.

permalink | May 21, 2021 at 09:18 AM | Comments (0)

October 3, 2019

Bomb Threat at Cabot Yerxa Elementary

On October 3, 2019 at approximately 10:36 AM, Desert Hot Springs Police Department responded to Cabot Yerxa Elementary School in Desert Hot Springs after kitchen staff at the school received a phone call indicating there was a bomb within the school.

Officers arrived and quickly determined the call was a hoax after ensuring there was not a bomb on the school grounds. Detectives immediately began investigating the call and with department resources and tools, quickly identified, located and arrested the suspect within 90 minutes of him placing the original call to the school. Detectives arrested 31-year-old Jerrett Tagger III of Landers, CA, who was booked into Robert Presley Detention Center for the following charges:

  • PC 422 - Criminal Threats
  • PC 148.1(c) - False Report of a Bomb in Public Place

Jerrett Tagger III
Jerrett Tagger III

permalink | October 3, 2019 at 05:21 PM | Comments (0)

December 29, 2018

DHS Police Officer Placed On Admin Leave

The Desert Sun story, and because the Desert Sun website is notoriously unreliable, here is the full text.

A Desert Hot Springs police officer has been put on administrative leave while the department's internal affairs office looks into exactly what took place between him and a woman struggling with a heroin addiction who associated with car thieves and drug dealers.

At the core of the internal affairs investigation is a set of text messages between the officer and the woman. They paint a picture of a relationship that went beyond friendship, and may have violated the department's policies.

The department conducted an administrative inquiry into the matter in September, but after The Desert Sun met with the city's police chief to review information about the incident, the department reopened the case in December.

The department has released little information about the case, but The Desert Sun has pieced together some of what took place using a transcript of the pair's text messages, department records obtained under California's public records law, court documents and interviews with some of the people involved.

On Nov. 12, The Desert Sun briefly interviewed Desert Hot Springs police Officer Travis Chapman, the officer involved. Neither Chapman, nor the woman, nor the department's chief of police Dale Mondary dispute that the texts are real.

The Desert Sun is not naming the woman, who is at risk for retribution because of the nature of the information she shared with police, and has omitted some identifying facts related to her story. Also, texts quoted in this article have not been corrected for grammatical mistakes or misspellings.


Early meetings

The woman, who is in her early 30s, said she met Chapman in the spring of 2018.

Chapman, during the course of a criminal investigation, had been monitoring the neighborhood where the woman was living. He stopped her on the street to ask about people who had been going in and out of where she was staying. She didn't tell him much, she said, and ended the conversation quickly.

Chapman went to the neighborhood a second time a few weeks later and again stopped her to talk. But again, she didn't say much. Chapman gave her his card and told her to stay in touch.

Several weeks later, in late May, she had another run-in with the DHS police when an officer pulled over a black sedan on Palm Drive for a busted headlight and expired registration.

The woman was in the passenger seat; the driver's license was suspended and he was on probation, police records show.

While one officer arrested the man for driving with a suspended license, another officer asked her if she had drugs, she told The Desert Sun. She told him she did, and the officer found two baggies in her purse, one containing about a half-gram of methamphetamine, the other containing about a half-gram of black tar heroin, according to police records.

Records show she was arrested on suspicion of possession of narcotics, however she and the driver were both issued citations and then released with later court dates.

Police records don't indicate Chapman was at the stop in May, and the woman said he wasn't there. But Mondary, the city's police chief, said Chapman was there.

Riverside County prosecutors filed charges against the driver about five weeks later. Charges against the woman were filed in September, after what appears to be months of provocative text conversations and late-night meetings between her and Chapman during the summer of 2018.

An intensifying text relationship
In an interview with The Desert Sun, the woman said she knows the text messages now seem inappropriate.

She said her relationship with Chapman, which is the subject of an ongoing internal affairs investigation, was friendly and flirty. She said she had a crush on him, but said they never had sex.

Chapman also told The Desert Sun they did not have sex.

"We interviewed them both and could not find evidence that they had a sexual relationship," Mondary said.

The text message transcripts, combined with DHSPD timesheet records obtained by The Desert Sun, show Chapman routinely began texting with the woman minutes after starting his shifts, and stopped when his shifts ended.

Chapman and the woman exchanged more than 1,600 texts over a two-month period.

Between the night of July 29 and the morning of July 30, during Chapman's shift, the pair exchanged more than 300 texts.

Chapman was not using a department-issued phone to text with the woman, Mondary said. The department does not issue officers cell phones. As a result, it's common for officers to have a personal phone they use only when on duty, he said.

Starting in late June, the woman texted Chapman using an online text application that could be used from a phone, tablet or computer, even without cellular service — as long as there was a Wi-Fi network available. She frequently didn't have cellular service for her phone, she said.

The application kept a record of their texts outside either of their phones, a useful feature for someone who gets a new phone frequently, like this woman, but a feature that also ensured their communications couldn't be easily erased.

The text transcripts were sent to The Desert Sun by an anonymous source who said they were concerned about Chapman's conduct. The transcripts only contain the pair's conversations between late June and mid-August.

The woman said she and Chapman began texting around the time of the traffic stop, but she said she no longer has access to the phone she was using at that time.


A partner in crime

Just before midnight on June 26, the woman texted Chapman that her phone number didn't work anymore.

"Pls answer," she texted, "I miss u."

She apologized to Chapman for being difficult to contact.

"How many dam numbers u going to switch on me," Chapman texted back and added that he could get her a phone if she needed one.

In the coming days, they arranged meetings — several at Starbucks and one on a residential street.

"Id rather have u then Starbucks anyway," she texted.

"Ur lucky ur my one and only partner in crime," Chapman texted later.

"I better be," she responded.

Their texts alternated between flirtatious – frequently sexually-charged – comments and photos and information she could provide about Chapman's criminal investigations.

Her addiction also became a point of tension. Sometimes she didn't respond to messages for hours, then texted that she had been high. Chapman became upset, but told her he didn't care that she got high, only that she didn't respond to him.

She grew up in New England with a stable family, both the woman and her mother told The Desert Sun, but as a young adult, shegot addicted to heroin.

She came to the Coachella Valley in the summer of 2015 for an in-patient drug rehabilitation program. Her mother said it was her 14th time in rehab. After seven months, she left the rehab facility and tried to restart her life in the Coachella Valley.

Her mother said she supported her daughter until she found out she was seeing a man involved in criminal activity. The woman and her boyfriend began spending time with her boyfriend's friends in Desert Hot Springs, and before long she was using heroin again.

When her boyfriend was sent to prison for forgery in October of 2017, following a string of other criminal convictions, she stayed in Desert Hot Springs with his friends.


Getting her attention

Just before 11 p.m. on July 18, she texted Chapman that someone was coming to the apartment with a stolen truck. The texts show she sent some details about the truck. Chapman spotted it, ran the plates, and texted that the vehicle was not reported stolen.

"I ran back to the station to check something on the plate," Chapman texted. "I feel like he swapped the plates or something. When did he say he got it?"

"Ugh this is stressful," she texted at 1:45 a.m.

According to DHSPD records, Chapman pulled over the truck about 90 minutes later. Records show the stop was concluded with: "Party advised," which Mondary said could mean the driver was informed that something appeared to be wrong, like an expired registration, but that a citation was not written.

"I pulled your ppl over," Chapman texted the woman at 4:25 a.m. on July 19.

"I know you did lol," she responded.

"I had to try and get Ur attention somehow," Chapman said. "I hate when you ignore me."

He asked why she had stopped responding to his texts for several hours.

"Why couldn't u answer? What were u doing," Chapman asked.

"U want me to be honest w u," she responded.

"Yup,' Chapman texted. "Always."

She texted that she had gotten high. She asked Chapman why he was so mad.

"Because u blew me off for 3 hours," he said. "And that truck left."

Throughout the texts between the two, Chapman became upset with the woman when she stopped responding to his texts. And when the two weren't texting romantic or sexually-charged comments at each other, Chapman pressured her for information about criminal activity.

"U have my word," she responded. "I'll get u a car."

"I'm not doubting u," Chapman said. "But think how I feel u chose getting high over helping."

"I got high and nodded off," she texted. "It's not an excuse."


I could get you paid
Throughout July, their texts increased in frequency, and the two met more and more often.

They followed the same pattern, going from explicit and sexual – referencing her genitals and talking about how sexually aroused they were – to Chapman pressing her for information about crimes.

He often brought her snacks and drinks. Once, when she texted that she was feeling sick, he asked her, if she was pregnant. She said no.

On July 22, she texted Chapman about another allegedly stolen vehicle.

He asked her to describe the vehicle so he could find it and run the plates.

"I wanna get her ridding dirty," he texted, referring to driving a stolen vehicle.

She texted that she couldn't get more information without raising suspicions, that she was having second thoughts about providing information and that she didn't want all her associates to get in trouble.

"If I knew the car I could call the RAID unit who deals with stolen cars and probably get u paid," Chapman texted.

The Riverside Auto Theft Interdiction Detail, RAID for short, is a multi-agency task force that investigates auto theft throughout Riverside County.

Mondary said it's possible to pay people for information that leads to an arrest, but Chapman couldn't authorize RAID payment.

She didn't need to get paid, the woman texted a few minutes later, and besides, someone quickly left with the car. Chapman asked where it was headed. They were driving to a dealer's house, she texted back, to get heroin.

"I want a pursuit lol," Chapman texted. "I need some excitment."

According to department records, Chapman conducted a vehicle check 40 minutes later, between the house where the woman was staying and the area where she said the dealer was located. The records show no action was taken.

"Well tonite will be more exciting," she texted. "I promise."

Chapman asked why.

"Umm because ill be in ur front seat," she responded. "Whats more exciting than that."


Get me another good bust

On July 24, the woman tried to discuss her mixed feelings about her relationship with Chapman, over text message, and about what would happen if they were found out. Chapman reassured her, then diverted the conversation.

He asked for her login information for her Facebook account, to look up information about one of the victims in a case he was working. She texted him her email address and password.

Chapman then downloaded pictures off her Facebook account and texted them to her.

"Last time im giving u my pw," she texted.

The woman told The Desert Sun she later found out Chapman had read messages she sent other people from her account, which she said she found misleading in hindsight.

But at the time, the old pictures started a different kind of conversation. She asked Chapman if he was alone. He said yes and asked why.

"Well i was gonna send u some other pics," she said. "But only if ur alone"

"I'm alone now," Chapman said. "Let's see em."

She texted that she was nervous about sending sexually-explicit photos. Chapman told her not to overthink it. She responded she was afraid of the direction things were heading in, as well as of the risks that came along with their relationship.

"I just get weird still cuz u are still a cop," she said.

"What does me being a cop mean?" Chapman asked.

"Ummmm," she texted. " Idk i guess theres certain 'boundaries' i cant cross."

"Well I'll be sure to tell to U when u do. so far u haven't," Chapman texted.

According to the text transcripts, the woman started sending photos on July 25, which continued until Aug. 15.

On July 29, Chapman texted that he liked finding photos on his phone when he got to work. The woman said she liked to make him smile.

She later texted that she was thinking of committing a crime so he would come and arrest her.

"Cuz last time when u had a gun pointed at me," she said, "got ms all excited."

"Well get me another good bust and I'll do it again," Chapman responded.

On July 30, Chapman also texted about his complicated feelings toward her. He texted that he didn't like the relationships he knew she was having with other men. He said he was jealous that she called them "lover."

"I'm just over here like....." Chapman texted.

"Cuz idk how u would feel if i called u love," she said.

"Id feel better than I do seeing u call all these pieces of shit that," Chapman texted in response.

They argued about what form their relationship was taking and how different their lives were. She said he didn't understand what it was like to be an addict. Chapman said he knew people who struggled with addiction. But they ultimately changed subjects.

"Send me a pic to wake up to," he texted just after his shift ended.

Later that day, she texted him a photograph while Chapman was in a work meeting. The text transcript provided to The Desert Sun did not contain the images, only an indication that an image was sent. Chapman texted that he was afraid to open it, because he didn't know the content of the photo.

"Better be for my eyes only," he texted.

"It is," she texted. "I promise."


You're not going to get hurt

Early on the morning of Aug. 14, Chapman tried to call the woman four times, but she didn't pick up. He texted that he was worried. Later that morning, she asked him what the problem was.

Chapman texted that he felt like she didn't miss him. She responded that she did miss him, but said she needed to keep her distance.

"Ill end up wanting something or having an expectation that will never happen and I'll get hurt and that will suck," she said. "Even tho im gonna get hurt anyways."

"Youre not going to get hurt," Chapman texted.

She texted that someone had another stolen vehicle at the house and Chapman asked for a plate number.

But she stopped answering the texts. He called her six times, but got no response.

"Quit ignoring me for ur drug bf's," he texted.

"Shut up they just showed up here," she responded. "I didn't tell them to come."

"I don't care what u do ive told u that just don't blow me off that drives me nuts," Chapman texted.

They arranged to meet up after he got off work.

"Like not in my po po car," Chapman texted.

They made plans to meet shortly after his shift ended on Aug. 15.

Over the next several days, their texts became erratic and infrequent. Soon, things took an unexpected turn.


The texts come to light
On Aug. 20, Chapman texted that he had to tell the woman something. They spoke by phone.

"U sounded so upset on the phone : ( ," she texted just before 8 p.m.

"I am," he responded.

She told The Desert Sun that Chapman was upset because he thought her fingerprints might be on a stolen car that had just been found. If so, she recalled him saying, she could become a suspect in the case.

But on top of that, she said someone found their texts.

"It seems we are both having a fucked up night," Chapman texted at 9:46 p.m.

"I'm about to cry," she responded.

She said that the person found the texts on her tablet, downloaded them from the texting app and started sending them to others and posting them on social media.

"Are u done playing with fire," Chapman asked at 11:35 p.m. on Aug. 20.

"Wh at do u mean," she texted at 12:05 a.m.

"We need to talk in person," Chapman responded.

Chapman started his shift on Aug. 20 at 6 p.m. and worked until 6 a.m. the next morning.

The texts ended abruptly after they coordinated a meet up at a hotel in Desert Hot Springs at 5 a.m. the morning of Aug. 21.


The fallout

In late August, the Riverside County District Attorney's Office filed a misdemeanor complaint against the woman for one count of possession of methamphetamine and one count of possession of heroin stemming from the traffic stop in May.

Meanwhile, she was still dealing with the severe fallout over her relationship with Chapman, which had been exposed. The texts between her and Chapman had spread among her circle and the response online was fierce.

Some people directly threatened her for providing information to the police.

Others told her to leave Desert Hot Springs, and warned that she'd be injured if she stayed.

Around that same time, the woman posted on her Facebook page that someone had hacked her account.

When the texts were found, so was the login information she texted to Chapman. She said in the post that people should be aware that false information might be sent from her accounts.

She said Chapman and others told her a local gang was planning to kill her.

A few weeks after the texts were found, the woman said Chapman told her the department could get her a flight to wherever she wanted. But she said she declined the offer.

The woman currently has an outstanding bench warrant for not appearing in court on the two misdemeanor possession charges filed against her in August for the traffic stop back in May.

"I was told they might not even file the charges," she said. "I didn't even know I had a court date."

Mondary, the Desert Hot Springs chief of police, said an anonymous informant sent him the transcripts of the text messages at 3:30 a.m. on Sept. 16, with a note from the informant saying "look how this officer uses and abuses his powers."

"We have been aware of this and are investigating the officer's actions and it will be handled appropriately," Mondary said in an email to the informant on Sept. 17.

Mondary opened an administrative inquiry into Chapman's relationship with the woman on Sept. 17, he said.

"I wasn't happy one bit with what I found in the text messages," Mondary said. "Our administrative inquiry found violations of department policy, and we took what we found to be appropriate action."

On Oct. 4, Mondary said, Chapman's administrative inquiry was closed.

Mondary said he could not disclose what action the department took against Chapman because of officer privacy laws.

"We blew up with the disclosure of these texts," Mondary said. "A number of officers have been informed about how to manage developing sources in the future."

Mondary said Chapman was told to cease all communication with the woman. Following the incident, Mondary said, department policies about inappropriate relationships have been reiterated to DHS police officers.

The department's procedures manual prohibits officers from engaging in any sexual activity while on duty, establishing an inappropriate personal relationship as a result of an investigation or associating personally with people who are involved in recurring criminal activity.

The same day the inquiry was closed, Chapman was recognized as one of three officers who were awarded "2018 Desert Hot Springs Police Officers of the Year Award" by the Palm Desert Area Chamber of Commerce at the 22nd annual Peace Officer & Public Safety Awards.

The Desert Sun called Chapman on the phone number from which he texted the woman.

Chapman confirmed that the texts were actually sent between him and the woman, but said the woman was not acting as a confidential informant.

"We don't have any documented confidential informants," Chapman said. "Anybody who provides us with information is doing so as a concerned citizen."

Chapman said the texts were being sent around in an attempt to get back at the woman.

"Her friends got caught and they're upset," he said. "They're trying to get her in trouble by exposing her to the media."

Chapman said he is confident that his relationship did not violate any department policy.

"The department did not take any action against me," he said about the administrative inquiry. "They found that I did nothing wrong."


Another look

After a Dec. 17 meeting with The Desert Sun to discuss the texts, Mondary received a copy of the texts. He decided additional action was warranted.

Mondary said he did not possess a complete copy of the texts before The Desert Sun shared them with him.

"Parts of this were used in our inquiry," Mondary said. "What I was sent was on Facebook messenger and I was not able to print that out. I have a few select messages but not all of them."

Mondary wrote in an email that the department would begin a new internal affairs investigation and that Chapman would be placed on leave with pay until further notice.

"In light of new information that was reported to the department," Mondary said, "I made the determination to place the officer on administrative leave until we can conduct a more thorough investigation."

permalink | December 29, 2018 at 01:22 PM | Comments (0)

October 15, 2018

Wende Museum Of The Cold War

I recently visited the Wende Museum of the Cold War in Culver City, which had been on my gotta-see list for quite a while. Open to the public Friday, Saturday and Sunday; no charge for admission; check the website for variations on that. It's right next door to Veterans Memorial Park which is right next door to Veterans Memorial Auditorium.

City of Culver City (4838)

On the other end of the museum sits the House of Warrior Poetry (Dance. Parkour. Acrobatics. Action Arts. Yoga. Movement.).
House of Warrior Poetry (4829)

Veterans Memorial Auditorium - Culver City (4836)
Veterans Memorial Auditorium - the marker out front was placed in 1950, so call it 1950.

Kimmy Schmidt Fashion (4850)
In the museum I thought the cover of this magazine said "1961."
Only when I went to edit it did I see it was actually 1981! It sure has the look of 1961.

Yuri Gagarin (4862)
Yuri Gagarin hanging out with kids.

Wende Museum of the Cold War (4874)
Sly Lenin.

Entertainment Center (4877)
Soviet radio.

You can see all the photos here.

permalink | October 15, 2018 at 11:12 PM | Comments (0)

February 6, 2018

Miller High Life/Molotov Cocktail in DHS

Molotov Cocktail Arrest

Support Services Manager Tom Pittenger from Desert Hot Springs Police Department · 34m ago

On 02/05/2018, at approximately 1630 hours, Desert Hot Springs Police Officers were dispatched to a residence in the 66000 block of 2nd St, reference a family disturbance. The occupants of the residence refused to cooperate but after approximately 30 minutes, they exited the residence after police officers conducted a surround and call out due to circumstances noted on scene.

A probation search of the residence was conducted. During the search, Officers located two Molotov cocktails in the kitchen of the residence. Cal Fire Law Enforcement Division responded to assist in the investigation.

Bernadette Noriega (age 49), Jesus Noriega (age 28) and Mario Vigel (age 19) were arrested for PC 18715-Possession of Explosive Device, PC 148(a)-Resist or delay Law Enforcement, PC 273A(a)-Child Endangerment as well as several other related charges. All three subjects were transported and booked into RSO Banning Jail.


Bernadette Noriega, Jesus Noriega, Mario Vigel and a Molotov cocktail in a Miller High Life bottle

permalink | February 6, 2018 at 07:20 PM | Comments (0)

November 14, 2017

"Captain America"

In 2012 the FBI developed an informant who was a tow truck driver in south L.A. He wore a camera and documented corruption among L.A. County Sheriff Deputies. The code name for the informant was "Captain America." It was only after gathering evidence that the FBI discovered their informant was using a false name, was in the U.S. illegally, and had prior convictions for burglary and credit card fraud, among other things. The evidence then was turned over to the Sheriff's Department who used it to deal with the offenders administratively.

"Captain America" is still in the U.S.

permalink | November 14, 2017 at 10:46 AM | Comments (0)

October 12, 2017

Reverse Logic?

California has a new law that will increase the punishment for some crimes if they are recorded on video. Here's the business part of the new law: "667.95. In sentencing a person convicted of a violent felony listed in subdivision (c) of Section 667.5, the court may consider, as a factor in aggravation, that the defendant willfully recorded a video of the commission of the violent felony with the intent to encourage or facilitate the offense."

But those videos have been helpful in getting convictions and lengthening sentences. Why do we want to discourage that? I'm all for some additional punishment if the video is made public, but if it's not made public what's the reason for an enhanced sentence?

permalink | October 12, 2017 at 10:34 AM | Comments (0)

October 8, 2017

Kansas City Fire, 1959

I was five years old at the time of this fire and I'm just hearing about it now.

permalink | October 8, 2017 at 08:34 PM | Comments (0)

September 14, 2017

A Short, Pointless Life

DennisCruz
Dennis Cruz
, arrested in DHS in 2010, died yesterday at age 28 in the prison in Corcoran, shanked by a fellow inmate who had chased him into the prison yard.

permalink | September 14, 2017 at 04:43 PM | Comments (0)

June 29, 2017

Chicago Police Charged

Once, when I expressed an opinion that the very small number of bad cops were being protected by a much larger number of "good" cops who kept silent or assisted in cover-ups, I was told by a retired cop that I "watch too many movies." Uh-huh.

permalink | June 29, 2017 at 11:32 AM | Comments (0)

May 2, 2017

Now It Becomes Just Plain Murder

Dallas police officers who, using a rifle, shot and killed the 15-year old passenger in a moving vehicle said the car was backing up toward the police at high speed. But that was more than 24 hours ago. Now the Police Chief has admitted the car was moving , away from the cops and not in any sort of aggressive manner. The cops had been called to the neighborhood for a complaint about a loud party.

"The statement said officers fired on the car after they heard gunfire from an 'unknown altercation.'"

A random gunshot from somewhere is always perfect justification for shooting at the first thing that moves, no matter what it is.

UPDATE: The Police Chief actually used the workd "misspoke" in his explanation.

permalink | May 2, 2017 at 01:32 AM | Comments (0)

March 6, 2017

P-45: The Studly Mountain Lion King of Malibu

Here's a really interesting New Yorker article about the mountain lions of the Santa Monica Mountains which run from Malibu to Griffith Park. The highways have isolated this area, in terms of mountain lions traveling. P-45, however, was able to cross a highway to get into this genetic island and sow his genes. The article describes the isolation of the mountain lions which may result in their extinction (in the Santa Monica Mountains) within 50 years...which is why a land bridge is going to be built in Agoura Hills.

On this map you can see the underpass at Liberty Canyon that they believe P-45 may have used to get across the 101 and into the Santa Monica Mountains. You can see there are gaps in the residential developments there that would allow a mountain lion to pass through without having to deal directly with humans. This is where the land bridge will be built.

permalink | March 6, 2017 at 08:30 PM | Comments (0)

February 6, 2017

Carjacked 1,200 Pounds Of Marijuana

In Pomona! They were caught when they were spotted from the police helicopter unloading the weed in the "700 block of Washington." So I went to Google maps to look at the aerial view to see if possibly there were other indications.

Well, looky here. Can you pick out the weed house in this neighborhood of neat homes? I imagine the police already had their eye on this place.
700 block of Washington in Pomona

permalink | February 6, 2017 at 07:15 PM | Comments (0)

February 3, 2017

Finnish Motorcycle Chase

Here’s a rare video. It's a police chase (ho hum) but it's motorcycle chasing motorcycle in Finland! With no cuts, this video is almost 34 minutes long, but the first 8 minutes and 15 seconds is nothing but what the cop happened to be doing for the 8 minutes and 15 seconds before he leaped into action. I assume it was a radio call that got him going. I can't see any motorcyclist breaking any obvious traffic rules that would have triggered him. So this video starts at the 8:15 point.

I wish I knew why this guy was being chased. The chase pushes him to make a lot of dangerous maneuvers and the chasing cop copies him in almost every move. Obviously, other people on the road were endangered. But there doesn't seem to be the sort of congestion I'm used to seeing in an American city - neither people nor traffic.

In the video you won't hear the cop relaying his location and direction to dispatch, as you would in America. I don't know of any maneuvers that can be performed by a chasing motorcycle cop to force the other one to stop. Can't do a pit maneuver. So it would seem his only hopes of catching this guy were either he'd run out of gasoline, or he'd make a mistake and crash, or the chased would simply give up, or other police would get ahead of the chase to try to block him off. But help never arrives. At least three times a police van appears ahead of him, sitting in the road. Once it looks like that cop is there only to control traffic while the chase goes through. In the other two appearances, the cops with the vans appear to be doing nothing, but if the chased man wanted to surrender and get a nice ride back to jail, they were there to serve.

Notice the one surprising scene where our cop gets well ahead of the chased, who had stopped in order to avoid an accident. The chased hurriedly gets back into his usual position, even though he had the opportunity there to turn right and go the wrong way on the entrance ramp. That might have given him enough head start to get away.

Finnish cop in motorcycle chase
This is the cop who did the chasing
. We don't see him until seconds before the video ends.

I don't want to spoil the ending, but I'll tell you I was surprised at how fast the chased person could run on two legs! He did way better than Americans who try to run from the cops.

permalink | February 3, 2017 at 05:39 PM | Comments (3)