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January 28, 2018

Fitness Trackers

Here’s the news story about Strava posting a “global heat map” of fitness tracker usage. The news concerns what it reveals about military bases, but I looked at the Strava heat map to see if it told me anything about Desert Hot Springs.
Strava Heatmap Desert Hot Springs

It seems to me that someone (or ones) in Mission Lakes Country Club are doing a lot of exercising. Some of the more heavily used routes around DHS are where cyclists ride, including the upcoming Tour De Palm Springs.

Strava global heat map.

Filed under Coachella Valley,Desert Hot Springs,Sports,Technology | permalink | January 28, 2018 at 03:40 PM | Comments (0)

January 25, 2018

Apple Store Experience

One person who views her Apple Store experience as chaotic.

Another person responds saying the situation she described was actually good customer service.

Part of the initial confusion is that even though she is an Apple customer she hasn't figured out that the stores (or, all the Apple stores I've been to) have an employee near the front door who handles triage. The first time I encountered that I thought it was pretty bad service too, because what I saw was an employee standing there doing nothing, who offered to help me, but then wouldn't help me but sent me to another employee. Why they don't give that employee a hat saying "Triage" or something everyone could understand, I just don't know.

As for where to line up for a cash register?! I want to ask how old that author is and has she ever been in an Apple Store before. The customer stands still. The Apple Store will make an employee appear magically at your side and if you are really integrated into Apple, you won't even have to pull out your credit card. The great borg already knows it. I don't know what happens if you want to pay in cash. I've never seen that in an Apple Store. Maybe a Federal Reserve Employee will appear next to you to make sure all your bills are clean and crisp.

I got the glass replaced on my 6S Plus once. I set up an appointment online. Went in. Triage guy sent me to hang out around the Genius Bar. Someone called my name. Took my phone. I don't know how long I waited, but not very long at all. The Genius brought my phone back to me, fixed. I would expect that to go less smoothly if I went into a busy Manhattan store with no appointment.

The one serious bitch I ever had with the La Quinta Apple Store was when I bought online (probably my Mini) and had my purchase sent to the store for pick up. The instructions I got from Apple were to show them a printout which identified me and my purchase. I think I went through three employees before one understood what I was asking for. The second time I did that, it went flawlessly, so maybe somebody got some training in the interim.

Filed under Shopping | permalink | January 25, 2018 at 07:53 PM | Comments (1)

January 22, 2018

Slides, Slides and Slides

Reverend Ch's T. Torrey, Abolitionist, Mt. Auburn Cemetery (3)
Reverend Ch's T. Torrey in Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

"It is better to die in prison with the peace of God in our breasts. than to live in freedom with a polluted conscience.
Torrey's Letter Feb. 7. 1846

Reverend CH'S T. TORREY.
Born at Scituate Nov. 21. 1813
Graduated at Yale College Aug. 1833.
Ordained at Providence
March. 1837.
Arrested at Baltimore
June 24. 1844.
Died in the Penitentiary of that City May 9. 1846

The friends of the American Slave erect this stone to his memory as a Martyr for Liberty.

Niʻihau Sunset - Kodachrome - 1986
Sunset view from Kauaʻi.
That island on the left is Niʻihau. Kodachrome 1986.

Isabella Steward Gardner Museum (2)
The interior courtyard of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in The Fenway, Boston.

Connecticut State Capitol (2)
The Connecticut State Capitol, Hartford.

Colonnade - Kodachrome - 1987
I have no recollection of where this is.
Kodachrome, 1987. In 1987 I lived in New England and traveled to Chicago, Washington DC and New York City. If you recognize this place, please leave a comment.

Chicago Water Tower - Kodachrome - 1987
Chicago Water Tower, Kodachrome, 1987.

Alcatraz - Polapan - 1985
Alcatraz 1985 on Polapan film.

Sunset Behind Beacon Hill Viewed From Charles-MGH Station - 1980s
Sunset behind Beacon Hill in the 1980s
.The point of view is the Charles/MGH Red Line station.

The Drake, Playboy Club - Kodachrome
Chicago, Kodachrome, probably 1987.

Yellow Hibiscus - 1986
Yellow hibiscus, probably in Hawaii.

Alcatraz - Agfachrome - 1985 (2)
Alcatraz, Agfachrome, 1985.

Bob and Ron on the Provincetown II - 1986
Myself (on the right) and Bob, aboard the Provincetown II ferry between Boston and Provincetown, 1986.
IIRC, we just went to P-town for lunch and then came right back to Boston. That was a thing to do back before the higher speed ferries appeared. The ferry would depart Boston about 9 AM, taking about 3 hours to get to P-town. Then you could do whatever until 3 or 3:30 when the return ferry embarked.

Boston Main Post Office - Kodachrome
Boston General Mail Facility (i.e., main post office) in Boston on Fort Point Channel.
This panorama was shot on Kodachrome.

Charles River Esplanade - Kodachrome
Flowering trees on the Charles River Esplanade, Kodachrome.

Charles River, Back Bay - 1985
Boats on the Charles River with the Longfellow Bridge and Back Bay skyline in the background, 1985.

Christian Science Mother Church - Agfachrome - 1985
The dome of the Christian Science Mother Church Annex on Agfachrome, 1985.

Dan & Ron, Hawaii - Kodachrome - 1986
Myself (with the camera, duh!) and Dan in Hawaii, 1986.
The film is Kodachrome.

Flower On A Stalk - Ektachrome - 1985
Ektachrome, 1985.

Dandelion - Polapan
Polapan film.

John, Charles River - 1985
John alongside the Charles River, 1985.

Pond With Ducks - Kodachrome - 1987
Kodachrome, 1987.

Memorial - Kodachrome - 1987
I don't recall where this is, but it must be in New England - probably the Boston area.
Kodachrome, 1987.

Steam Generation Plant at Sunset - Agfachrome - 1985, Kneeland Street, Boston
Steam generation plant on Kneeland Street in Boston.

San Francisco Pride - 1985
San Francisco Pride, 1985.

Trinity Church & John Hancock - 1986
A roof peak on Trinity Church in Boston with the old John Hancock building in the background.

White Tulip - 1987
1987.

The complete collection of scanned slide photos can be seen here.

Filed under Architecture,Cities/Urbanism,Photography | permalink | January 22, 2018 at 07:07 PM | Comments (1)

January 19, 2018

Desert Hot Springs City Council - January 16, 2018

These are some of what I think are the important bits of the January 16, 2018, meeting of the Desert Hot Springs City Council.


Fully Staffed Police Department

Five new police officers were sworn in. Chief Mondary said the police department is fully staffed. I think the definition of fully staffed is "up to the limit authorized by the City Council," because we all know our PD has never been staffed up the level we really need.


AIPP Cut To 0.25% In Industrial Zone

Some people didn't like that the AIPP rules were being assessed fairly for all kinds of property. That is, the value of the art or the amount of the in-lieu fee in effect since the program was approved in 2009 has been 0.5% of valuation for residential property and 0.75% of valuation for commercial and industrial properties.

The proposal was to eliminate the choice of putting a piece of art on site in the industrial zone. Development in the industrial zone would have to pay the in-lieu fee. I am not sure who didn't like it that the art paid for by the industrial developers would be displayed on the property developed. I didn't hear any of the City Council members express an objection to that.

This proposal went to the Planning Commission first, and they didn't like it. I could explain just why the Planning Commission didn't like it if the city's damn website would actually play the audio of that meeting, but it doesn't and they don't upload the audio to Youtube or any of the other several easy, reliable websites that actually play recorded audio flawlessly.

The choice before the City Council seemed to be to follow the Planning Commission's recommendation (leave things unchanged) or to re-insert the language taking the choice away from industrial developers. So imagine our surprise when Mr. McKee suddenly proposed to drop the rate for industrial development from 0.75% to 0.25%! Even more surprising was that Russell Betts immediately agreed to it! Ever since this program was approved, any mention of it would trigger a story-telling by Mr. Betts, in which story he would cast himself as the lonely white knight standing against everybody else who hates art. In reality, support for the AIPP program was widespread and the only discussion was the rates. The proposed rate was an even 1%, I believe, and Mr. Betts will tell you a story about how he had to fight to keep it as high as 0.75%. But now that it is 2018, he easily agreed to a two-thirds reduction in the rate.

Yvonne Parks had said she wouldn't vote for an ordinance that retained the 0.75% rate because she thought it was too high. But when the vote came, she still voted against it, even though the rate had been lowered to 0.25%. The vote was 4-1.

Some of the cannabis developers got up and complained about the surprising costs they've run into, and seemed to think this AIPP was something recently concocted to get more money out of them. In reality, the reason the cannabis developers are running into these expensive surprises is that many of them don't do sufficient due diligence (probably due to lack of experience in real estate) to find out all the expenses before they commit themselves. One cannabis developer argued that since he was having to build a road and put in underground infrastructure he ought to be excused from paying the AIPP. Again it's probably due to inexperience in real estate, but he didn't realize every developer is responsible for all that work and all those expenses. The city didn't come up with any new ideas to get in the way of cannabis development. Quite the contrary, they've now given them a two-thirds fee reduction.

In case you thought that the super-high price of land in our industrial zone would offset this rate cut, the cost of land is not included in the valuation against which the fee is assessed. IOW, it is a percentage of the value of the building only. Once you've removed the land cost, the value of the buildings will be whatever the usual value of such buildings are. The reduction in this fee is, therefore, a genuine cut to the amount of money that we would have expected to come into our AIPP fund.

Mr. McKee said he intended this to be temporary, and the council has asked that the ordinance be brought back before them in about 6 weeks to re-examine the rates. Mr. Betts said he didn't think it needed to be brought back; he was happy with the new 0.25% rate.


Resolution Setting Forth Certain Regulations Pertaining to Dispensaries

This item was removed from the agenda to be brought back at a later meeting. The proposed text in this agenda packet would have permitted a marijuana dispensary to change location, but they would still have to get a new CUP and any other of the usual necessary paperwork. The city started with 19 people who were allowed to seek a CUP and open a dispensary. Three of those people withdrew, leaving 16. Eight of those people have, indeed, opened dispensaries in town. The remaining eight still have all their rights intact, but the resolution would have specified that the right to apply for a CUP and open a dispensary is NOT transferable. The resolution also would have set the limit for cannabis dispensaries in the city at 16.

Here is a handy table provided in the agenda packet which you can use to keep track of the players. Click it for a bigger version.
DHS Marijuana Dispensary scorecard


New (and Re-Appointed) Commissioners

 MatasParksZavalaMcKeeBetts
CCACMichael PicardiBarbara EastmanMichael BurkeUntumane TurnerDonna Poyuzina
PlanningDirk Voss[hasn't decided]Jan PyeLarry BuchananScott De La Torre
Public SafetyDonna LozanoLee EastmanNina DuarteWalt MeyerTed Mayrhofen [this is not a typo]


New Library

Riverside County has proposed to build a completely new library on the vacant land between Aqua Soleil and the new county building at Park Lane and Palm Drive, entirely at County expense. The current library is 3,500 s.f. The proposed library would be 15,000 s.f.

When the current library opened in 1972 the population of the city was less than 3,000 and half of it was senior citizens. The official population is 9 times greater now, and it's 40% kids 18 and under.

This item simply authorizes city staff to continue to work with the county on this. After construction of the new library the old library will be converted to a broom closet, but it won't be big enough to let everybody keep their brooms there.

Filed under Cities/Urbanism,Coachella Valley,Desert Hot Springs | permalink | January 19, 2018 at 11:05 PM | Comments (0)

January 18, 2018

Le Sacre du printemps Under The Tree of Ténéré At Burning Man 2017

This is really good!

Filed under Art,Burning Man,Music,Photography | permalink | January 18, 2018 at 11:27 PM | Comments (0)

January 14, 2018

CES 2018

Complaint (4267)
This was supposed to be a display of a heavy lifting drone
, but instead they had to complain about the help.

HP AMP (4367)
I want to know what is the innovative advantage to having these features combined in one machine?
IOW, why put speakers on a scanner/printer? Here's the description from the display:

HP AMP is the first printer designed to enable seamless print and scan functions plus the ability to stream audio directly from a smartphone or tablet. The custom HP speakers with clear voice and exceptional 360° sound are backed by world class technology and HP's leadership in the print industry.

Foreo Exhibit (4398)
This exhibit showed some Burning Man influence, IMO
. The real warning signs about what we are supposed to realize is fictional. Or is it? Bit of a risk, maybe, with people coming from all over the world.

IBM Quantum Computer (1605)
IBM had this on display and said it is a quantum computer!
I certainly have no basis to doubt them. Until I saw this, I couldn't have said for sure if quantum computers actually existed as a physical reality or if they were still virtual while they worked out the details.

Las Vegas Monorail tracks at MGM Grand (4258)
Las Vegas Monorail tracks at MGM Grand
. This was my first time using the monorail. The train cars are pretty much the same as mass transit rail cars in any city, but I thought it was pretty interesting that in the city known for bright lights, flashiness and surprising architecture, the subway stations are very plain and functional looking. It's probably a good model for any city that wants to keep expenses down, but taxpayers seem to like beautiful train stations.

Mercedes at CES (4304)

Nagra HD Preamp (4358)
The description of this preamp from Nagra doesn't give me any clue why it got an innovation award
:

High End Audio preamplifier Designed to complement our flagship line of products called HD, for high definition. The Nagra HD PREAMP offers outstanding performance in terms of specifications as well as listening pleasure.

Sounds like more of the incremental improvement in audio that's been going on since Edison recorded "Mary Had A Little Lamb."

Nvidia VW Bus (4316)
I've no clue why this VW Bus was at the Nvidia exhibit
. It was after 6 PM when I saw it, and the convention was technically closed for the day, so no Nvidia people were around to clue us in.

OLED TV For Art (4277)
I really like these things
, but ya know what's got to happen? Cropping. The display looks like the relatively standard 16:9 aspect ratio, and not every master through the ages made paintings to that exact ratio. You will be given the choice of cropping or letter boxing, and I am sure most people will crop because it just looks neater. Below, for example, is the Mona Lisa cropped to a 16:9 ratio. I made a guess as to where Leonardo would have chopped off her elbows to do this.
Cropped Mona Lisa

Oh no, it just occurred to me that a lot of people will do the same thing they do with their TVs: ignore the aspect ratio and cram the whole image into 16:9 regardless. Below is the Mona Lisa abused like that:
Stretched Mona Lisa

Panasonic Radio (4295)
An early Matsushita radio
that was part of an exhibit of the history of Matsushita/Panasonic.

Polaroid Exhibit at CES (1598)

Rem-Fit Be Better In Bed (4410)
Part of the Rem-Fit Be Better In Bed exhibit
.

Sitael S.p.A. (4326)
"Magnetic Assisted Tap" is what they call this electric bike which won an innovation award
.

MAT connects online-bike and smartphone wirelessly. Its unique magnetic technology provides total vehicle control in one gesture. Edquipped with lock, security cable and handlebar remote control, MAT recognizes the user, disables the GPS anti-theft and enhances the riding experience.

Smacircle S1 (4322)
Smarcircle S1 folding electric bike, an innovation award winner
.

Smarcircle S1, the world's most compact and lightweight ebike. Weighing only 15.4 lbs, carbon fiber S1 can be folded in five simple steps into a small backpack and carried wherever and whenever. Feature-rich with iOS and Android apps, SMarcircle S1 is ideal for the connected commuter.

I thought it was a little odd that through all of CES in these sort of public descriptions of anything, they used imperial measurements, even though you know every single thing at CES has metric dimensions and every single attendee understands the metric system. Are they that concerned that some American (or Liberian or Burmese) yokel will wander in and be confused?

Oh my, I didn't know the term had been changed to "United States customary units," seemingly absolving the British Empire of blame.

Wi Surf (4343)
The Wi Surf (innovation award winner), which I found interesting for its plain exterior coupled with high claims
:

Wi Surf (Wireless Surface) is the world's first customizable and wireless modular induction charger and power supply station. It allows users to supply any device with direct current up to 60 W (per unit) and to remove 90% of cables and chargers from house, office and workshop.

Emphasis added by me. The percentage of cables I have that serve power is way blow 50%. So if this thing can get rid of 100% of chargers, how many cables does it need also to get rid of in order to make that 90% claim accurate, considering that everyone has way more cables than chargers?

Byton Dashboard Display (4313)
The dashboard display in a Byton
, which is a Chinese knock-off of a Tesla. I think that down lower, mostly out of sight are some elements of a classic, physical dashboard. There's got to be some place for an interface within easy reach of the driver. I don't think they're relying solely on voice commands.

Bluetooth Fanny Pack (4389)
A fuzzy fanny pack with stereo Bluetooth speakers
. This is aimed right at the sissy teenyboppers (of any gender) of the world. If they had shown one in pink...

Belkin Exhibit at CES (1589)
This was at an exhibit for what looked to me like a very capital intensive system of products to detect leaks, assure cleanliness, and avoid waste of water in a residence or business
.

Cubic Grid of Lights
This is a video.

Sony Display at CES
The huge display at the Sony exhibit
. It's a video, so click on it.

My complete set of photos from CES can be seen here.

Filed under Technology | permalink | January 14, 2018 at 11:02 AM | Comments (0)

January 12, 2018

The IBM Watson Exhibit at CES


via GIPHY

Filed under Photography,Technology | permalink | January 12, 2018 at 06:14 PM | Comments (0)

January 11, 2018

Seen at CES

I'm just back from two days at CES in Las Vegas and here's a video of one little thing I saw. This costume would, I believe, be acceptable at Burning Man, but wouldn't draw a crowd.

BTW, this company (Hisense) was displaying a 150-inch dual laser TV (in a darkened room) that was just stunning. Supposed to be easier on the eye because the laser light is reflected to your eyes rather than beamed directly as an LED screen (for example) would. Won't be on the market until later this year. They wouldn't estimate a price other than to say it will be more expensive than their 100-inch single laser display. That one goes for $30,000.

Filed under Burning Man,Photography,Technology | permalink | January 11, 2018 at 11:04 PM | Comments (0)

January 9, 2018

These slides aren't going to stop anytime soon

Prudential Center - Kodachrome - 2001 (stitched)
The Prudential tower in Boston
. This was stitched from several Kodachrome slides shot in 2001.

LDS Temple, Oakland - 1986
The Mormon Temple in Oakland in 1986.

Hartford
Downtown Hartford, circa 1986.

Golden Gate Bridge Tower - 1985 B&W
One of the towers on the Golden Gate Bridge
from 1985.

Flowers in Black & White

Diagonal, Iowa, 1988 Centennial - Ektachrome - 1991
Diagonal, Iowa's centennial in 1988 still being promoted in 1991
. Well made sign. This is Ektachrome and was shot during my bicycle ride from Boston to Kansas City that year. As I go through my slides I'm finding a few photos from that trip that I can't place at all, other than to say it was during that ride. If the scenery is level then the photo is probably from Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, or even Kansas or Missouri. If it's hilly, it's probably New York, but could be Massachusetts or even the corner of Pennsylvania that I rode through.

Bird In A Cage, Living Desert
At the Living Desert
, probably 2001.

Architectural Detail

There are many more slide scans to be seen here.

Filed under Architecture,History,Photography | permalink | January 9, 2018 at 06:00 PM | Comments (1)

January 6, 2018

A Small Batch Of Slides

Zebras, Living Desert - 2001 (2)
Zebras at Living Desert, 2001.

They That Go Down To The Sea In Ships, Gloucester - Kodachrome - 2002
"They That Go Down To The Sea In Ships"
, Gloucester, Massachusetts. Kodachrome, 2002. This was erected at the tercentenary of Gloucester in 1923 as a memorial to all fishermen lost at sea.

The Scout, Kansas City - Kodachrome - 1991
"The Scout,"
a sculpture of a Sioux Indian astride a horse. Kodachrome, 1991. This is in Kansas City and is considered one of the icons of the city. It was on the cover of the Kansas City phonebook for a number of years. Originally displayed at the 1915 Panama-Pacific Expo in San Francisco, it was installed temporarily in Kansas City after that. It was paid for and dedicated in 1922.

Palm Springs Resort - Ektachrome
A resort in the Warm Sands neighborhood of Palm Springs.
Ektachrome, probably 2001. This B&B used to be across the street from Inndulge, but has changed hands and undergone a major transformation since then.

Frog Pond Ice Rink, Boston Common - Kodachrome - 2002 (stitched)
In winter, the Frog Pond in Boston Common is transformed into a skating rink.
Stitched from three Kodachrome slides dated 2002.

Customs House Tower - Kodachrome - 1991
Customs House Tower in Boston
. Kodachrome, 1991.

Bunker Hill Monument - Kodachrome - 2002 (stitched)
The Bunker Hill Monument on Breed's Hill
in Charlestown, Boston. Stitched from three Kodachrome slides from 2002. The statue at the base of the monument is of Colonel William Prescott, commander of the American forces at the battle who gave the order "Do not fire until you see the whites of their eyes."

Filed under Architecture,History,Photography | permalink | January 6, 2018 at 08:55 PM | Comments (0)

January 3, 2018

I've got some slides to show you

Zakim Bridge, Boston - Kodachrome
The Zakim Bridge in Boston
, Kodachrome.

Zakim Bridge Under Construction - Kodachrome - 2001 (2)
Zakim Bridge under construction
, 2001, Kodachrome.

Zakim Bridge - Kodachrome (4)

Self on the George Washington Bridge north side - Ektachrome - 1996
Myself on the northern walkway of the George Washington Bridge
, 1996, Ektachrome. This was on the way to our second GNI Gathering in Pennsylvania with Michael C. The first year we had done a big curve coming from Boston so as to avoid NYC, crossing the Hudson at Poughkeepsie, I think.

This second year, we decided to go for the shorter route: Boston to New London, ferry to Long Island, thence to Queens, Manhattan, and then over to New Jersey on the Geo. Washington.

Neither of us had biked or walked across this bridge before and we were following some old directions that said the north side was for bicycles, the south side for pedestrians. Well, after some challenges, we got to the north side only to find it gated and locked. No way were we going to retrace our route back to try to find the entrance to the south side, so we just climbed over the gate, and climbed over the other one on the New Jersey end.

[I had a similar problem in a later year when I crossed from Queens to Manhattan via the Triboro Bridge rather than the Queensborough. Locked gates. Tossed my bike over and then climbed - both ends.]

This turned out to be the best way to get to New Jersey (as long as we didn't repeat the north side mistake), but after a couple years of this I found the best way to cross New Jersey itself (herself?) was to get a permit from the NJDOT to bicycle on I-80. Suddenly, there were no hills in the Garden State.

Massachusetts Turnpike, Allston - Kodachrome - 2002 (4)
The Massachusetts Turnpike in Allston
. I'm not sure exactly where this is. I think that bridge is Comm Ave just east of the BU Bridge. In that case, I would be standing on the BU Bridge to get this photo, but I'm not sure this angle is actually possible. If anyone familiar with the area can nail it down better, please leave a comment.

Market Street at Night from Twin Peaks - Kodachrome - 1992 (1)
San Francisco viewed from Twin Peaks
, Kodachrome, 1992.

Hoover Dam - Kodachrome - 2001 (8)
Hoover Dam
, 2001, Kodachrome.

Frog Pond at Twilight, Boston Common - 2001 (2)
Frog Pond in the Boston Common, 2001.

Headstones in an historical cemetery in Boston - Kodachrome - 1990
A pair of 18th century grave markers in Boston
. I do not recall exactly which cemetery this is, but those buildings in the background should help narrow it down. It's not Phipps in Charlestown. Maybe one of the Dorchester cemeteries. It's likely to be one of the city-owned cemeteries, since I led a bike tour of those a couple of times. Anyway, this is Mary Swift who died in 1785 (age 51?) and Mrs. Sarah Baker "the pious consort of Mr. John Baker." Date of death was 1788. This photo is Kodachrome from 1990.

Downtown Boston - Kodachrome - 2002 (1)
This is the building that sits above the State MBTA stop on the Blue & Orange lines in downtown Boston at the intersection of Devonshire and Water Streets (7 Water Street).
Kodachrome from 2002. It's the Winthrop Building. Architect: Clarence H. Blackall. Completed in 1894.

Dedication Ceremony For First LGBT Veterans Memorial - Ektachrome - 2001 (3)
The dedication of the first LGBT Veterans memorial in an officially designated Veterans area of a cemetery.
Cathedral City, 2001, Ektachrome. This is in the Welwood Murray Cemetery.

Farm Equipment - Kodachrome - 1989 (2)
I'm not sure where this is, but as farm equipment it looks a bit too large and potentially efficient for New England
. I'd have to guess Midwest, but where I was in the midst of the Midwest in 1989, I do not recall. Kodachrome.

Civil War Veteran, Swan Point Cemetery, Providence - 2001 (5)
A Civil War Veteran's grave marker in the Swan Point Cemetery in Providence, Rhode Island.
The photo is from 2001.

Charles River Esplanade in Autumn - Kodachrome -  2002
Looks like September on the Charles River Esplanade in Boston.
2002, Kodachrome.

Construction connecting Zakim Bridge to Big Dig - Kodachrome - 2001 (1)
This construction (2001, Kodachrome) was beside Causeway Street, next to the Boston Garden
and was connecting the new Zakim Bridge to the new Big Dig. I can't recall how they kept the traffic flowing here, while changing from an elevated highway to a tunnel and switching out bridges at the same time. Someone had described the Big Dig as being like open heart surgery performed on a marathon runner while he is running.

Filed under Architecture,History,Photography | permalink | January 3, 2018 at 08:23 PM | Comments (1)